User Experience

Creating Digital Content: What is It?

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Digital content includes the words, pictures/images and videos that we traditionally think about. But it also includes other things that haven’t always been traditionally at the forefront of content – it includes understanding how different technologies consume and display content, how that content needs to be architected to be able to be displayed and to be found, and how users want to consume that content based on devices and technology platforms.

Woah! Does that mean content is no longer king?

I fundamentally believe that content is king. But content can no longer drive other things – like layouts and designs and how it is consumed. WHAT???? (all the content people are freaking out right now).

So fundamentally – digital content is any content that exists in the form of data. But creating digital content has taken on some new meanings.

Some History

I’m not a know it all. In fact, I think that any one who wants to be considered digital can’t be a know it all. The space evolves way to fast for anyone to be an expert. I would actually consider myself a generalist, because as the space has evolved its driven deep subject matter expertise in things like content, analytics, AI/ML, voice, IoT etc. So I know a little about a lot of things and look for those who know a lot about minimal things to know that I’ve found a great partner. So for these reasons, this is a brief digital content history.

In traditional content, it was the content that drove the design and layout of pages. It did even in the first iteration of websites. To some degree it still drives some website or larger screened experiences.

There was the initial launch of the website. It could have some text and animated GIFs and maybe some photos. There was the abysmal digital magazine (gosh remember that?) – where we tried so hard to take an actual magazine and put it online. We calmed down and at some point were like “hey, let’s just PDF the darn things and put it up on the site.”

I recall the launch of parallax websites – because it was a way for imagery to be the true driver of the experience rather than the words. It was revolutionary and it was beautiful. Parallax websites were revolutionary because it got digital content out of this box that we were all stuck in, and closer to that magazine like experience we were hoping for online.

Then we realized content needed to be found and devices began to rapidly change and social media launched. Content as king became even more apparent, but what did change dramatically was how content’s ability to drive design took a massive shift.

The change

Devices and technology began to drive layout and design and content design was now required to take somewhat of a back set.

If you don’t agree with me, it probably means you didn’t make the leap to what digital leaders are looking for when they are hiring. Just saying.

Here are some very real examples:

Remember flash? Well that has been a slow and agonizing death (yes, it’s still dying) – but what was most frightful for content creators when this became a reality at the time, was the basic ability to play videos and be able to view animation online. HTML5 jumped into be the saviour in this situation, but the truth was the death of flash was driven by technology and device changes. Video content was not at the forefront of that decision making. (The rivalry between Apple and Adobe also probably played a part in this – and the fact that iPhones weren’t going to support flash – but whatevs).

In 2005 YouTube launched and in 2007 the iPhone launched. Maybe a coinky dink – maybe market stressors provided ample opportunity to solve for the flash crisis. Whatever it meant – video content consumption changed. What it needed to be viewed changed. What it needed to be found changed. Decisions on using your own player or a social player changed. Whatever decision was made was driven by the technology changes and device changes and therefore meant that the content couldn’t drive the design.

Not true say you? I say try making a video that is longer than 45 seconds and see where you net out with that.

Usability changed as a result, and many content creators began to realize that social channels dedicated to videos were a better place to play than prop technology, because it made finding their content easier and it was where people who wanted to watch videos were. It was where they realized that they could try to make that 5 minute video all they wanted, but the costs and the consumption wasn’t really working out.

Twitter drove us to the 140 character limit – though newly expanded to 280. As it turns out, Twitter’s decision to extend the character limit on tweets has done little to change how people use the service. So um yeah – what was that about content driving design?

Today

Realistically speaking, do you think that based on the size of your watch screen and it’s underlying technology that it is content that dictates what get’s displayed? I would argue… not really. However, I would also take it one step further and argue – how users use it and what they want to consume will have huge influence in driving design.

Welcome UX and IA teams.

We have screens on watches on fridges in cars and this is going to continue to evolve. What we are going to see, is an evolution in what ends up being the simplest way for content to be consumed unilaterally by all of these things. We are going to continue to push the concept of “publish once and be everywhere”, for cost reasons: companies don’t have limitless buckets of money to hire 8 million specialized resources because we have 8 million ways to display; for logical reasons: why do we need to do this 8 million times in 8 million ways; and for future reasons: things are moving to voice which means content is going to be forced to do different things online, and with the rise of AI and ML content is going to be shaped and designed at times without human intervention.

Because of all of the above – content cannot drive design.

However, though it cannot drive design it still is king. So fundamentally it does mean that you need to be better at creating compelling, unique content. It also means that you need digital content specialists (IA/UX/SEO/digital copy writers) to help you prep your content for digital consumption and to meet new legal accessibility requirements (otherwise you should probably just publish paper copies).

And while I make no claims in being a digital expert, I do know this – if you want to show digital professionals that you have evolved past paper thinking… it means that you need to know how to make content king when it no longer drives design. It means you understand that how it is consumed will be dependent on how the device and therefore the underlying technologies flexibility in its UI exist.

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Updated: To Centralize or Not Centralize Digital

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centralized-vs-decentralized-md

 

I was inspired to write this post because of taking a new role, and having had the opportunity (at this point in my career) to see all variations and attempts at different digital business models.

While digital is a technology driven field, I do think that there lies some significant differences between digital and IT. For these reasons, there are markers between the two and for the most part the people who play in these arenas are able to identify them while understanding where the blur is. At the same time we understand that we also need one another.

All that said, I think that digital taking on IT business models may no longer the most efficient use of time and resources. Digital is considered disruptive in nature. It surprises me just how much of an IT business model digital departments adopted in the push to centralize things, rather than looking for business models that challenged the traditional architectures of what frustrated digital people about IT in the first place.

Without a doubt there is need to have a centralized place where there can be an inventory of digital assets, and aligning with enterprise wide technologies, standards and securities.  I agree that it makes sense to have guardians of the realm so that people aren’t running all willy nilly all over the place inventing broken experiences and orphaned or abandoned digital assets.  I get it.  I really do.  And more than anything I am a big proponent of not allowing things like this to happen in companies because of negative brand impact, user experience and more critically adoption and engagement that is such a central focus of Digital ROI and big data.

That said, most digital departments really need to look at their business model.  In small to mid sized companies a completely centralized digital business model makes sense.  They are more agile and flexible, making adapting to change and new technologies less rigid.

However, once you move into larger organizations this stops being efficient.  Now you have business units competing for dollars, shifted around as priorities of importance and girdlocked in process that allows technology and user experiences to become outdated and frustrating. This very quickly turns into brand trust and perception, things that take forever to develop and can so easily be broken.

Digital fluency needs to exist in all areas of the business, all the more reason why centralizing digital no longer makes sense as a business model.

Here is the structure I propose and why digital needs to become a more decentralized business model:

  1. Each business unit should have a dedicated digital team that controls, manages and governs their digital assets.  This dedicated team needs to sit within the unit to best understand the business needs, audience and goals they are trying to achieve.
  2. Having a dedicated team means that there needs to be dotted line reporting.  These roles should ultimately roll up into digital but have a dotted line reporting structure into the business unit.
  3. Vendor contract negotiation and relationship management for any technology that plugs into digital assets for the business unit, should reside in this group.  Ultimately at the end of the day, vendor shortfalls impact the digital experience.  Users have one experience.  They can’t see the difference.  If a vendor isn’t delivering which ultimately impacts brand perception and users, this group needs to have the authority to let them go and find better options.
  4. Digital Departmental budgets.  More and more independent business units need to begin considering that their budgets need to be inclusive of digital spends.  IT needs to take care of the enterprise wide infrastructure without a doubt.  Parametres need to be set, however digital departments within the unit should have their own budgets to provide ongoing website maintenance, ad hoc campaigns, or added features that may not have risen to the top of the IT priority and budget chain enterprise.
  5. This structure should also remove lock downs on existing or new digital assets.  It made sense in the past to have front end dev, CMS’s and SEO locked down in old world structures.  People in the business unit  were not digital or tech savvy enough to understand what they were doing or the ramifications of what an error on their end could cause.  With digital people in existence, much of this has changed, therefore the ability to do front end things needs to be opened up to allow for customization and elements that may short term in nature.
  6. Lead the overall strategy with regards to device roll outs within the unit. Sounds insane right?  But digital needs to work closely with the business unit and with IT to determine what makes the most sense.  Otherwise you end up in what I call the digital  “black hole.”  That’s the place where your sales team all got new iPads that would enhance their abilities in the field all while the enterprise infrastructure and business unit technology was never optimized or able to support a mobile experience.
  7. Regular regroups with the enterprise wide digital team.  Being ultimately tied back and part of the digital team, means that regular meetings need to happen.  Weekly with the reporting manager, and monthly with the digital team as a whole.  This would allow for idea sharing, resolution sharing, and identifying what the common trends are across the enterprise that may require deeper and more extensive research or dedication.

 

Observation as part of Digital Strategy

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observationOne of the most fascinating aspects of digital communications to me, is that more than ever does observation play a critical role in determining an appropriate strategy.

For those who love people watching, well – this is for you!  Being able to observe and make deductive decisions assist in creating insights that will strongly benefit your overall strategy.

Here are 5 reasons why observation is necessary:

1.  People have behaviours.  These behaviours are usually habitual.  If you are able to tap into a human habit digitally, it means that you have found a way of integrating into a users life if what you put forth provides a value ad or solves a problem for them.

2. Observing allows you to identify a problem that a user may not even know that they have.  People tend to compensate a behaviour when they assume that there is no other way to do something.  When you find what that is, you can create a product/service to fill a void people did not even know that they had.

3. You can better understand how the user actually uses something.  Professions such as Information Architecture and User Expereince come from this.  Understanding how people typically use an app or website means that you can design to make it easy to use or teach a new behaviour.

4. You can make it better.  Apple is famous for this.  Every year people camp out for a new iteration of something that is even just a minimal improvement.

5. Data alone does not provide you enough contex.   Numbers in surveys or reports and analytics are just that.  They are numbers.  In order to be able to find insight and create a compelling story for those numbers having actual context and opportunity to obseve how these number fluctuate and for what reasons means that you can make stronger decisions for a better strategy,